Inherited Garden.

Our house was finished being built in 1970.
Our garden is a collection of various owners likes and loves covering the last 40 years.
In some cases this is beautiful, in others it had the potential to be beautiful if the next person hadn't planted a large tree near to it or over crowded it or just maintained it.

The problem with overgrown inherited gardens is that the new owner will often not know the growth habit of a plant until they have lived with it for a while and it takes a least a year to get a good awareness of what is hiding beneath the soil ready to bust forth in its appropriate seasonal glory.

beautiful in is perfect, delicate plainness 
After many more than just a year here we are still making discoveries.
After some major clearing of a shrubby overcrowded area earlier this year a clump of bulbs burst fort, not bearing any flowers but a bunch a bulbs hiding buried in the bushes for 10 years unknown to me. I'm wondering what they are something in the vein of daffodils or jonquils I am guessing by their size, shape and timing.

In recent months we removed, well our neighbour actually removed, two large diseased conifers from our boundary. This is letting the sun in to long shaded areas of our back garden and trees on the outside edge of our fence, imagine my surprise heading out there today to find these beauties growing at the base of a tree along with some ( dreaded here ) honeysuckle that we have never seen at that side of the property! They were all well weighed down by an insidious sticky climbing weed we have growing here like wildfire.


They are all so plain when I think of what freesias have the potential to be, they are white or maybe brown, the colour of parchment paper, delicately veined, some pointing down rather than up. Totally beautiful in their own right and made more so by the fact they lay dormant for so many years in an area devoid of sun, a place someone once thought to plant some bulbs and honeysuckle along with the young tree that now stands tall above us. Laying in wait to provide me with a wonderful rainy afternoon surprise. :)

2 comments:

  1. What a glorious bonus. I love fresias.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Do freesias (sorry dont know how to spell them) have a lovely scent, i seem to remember my dad planting some years ago and the perfume was amazing.

    ReplyDelete

Thanks so much for stopping by and letting me know you were here. x
Have a happy Day.